AMWatch

Depositors are next as Nordic banks buckle under negative rates

Ever since negative interest rates became a thing, banks have been too afraid to pass them on to retail depositors. That may be about to change.

Jesper Berg, the head of the Danish Financial Supervisory Authority in Copenhagen. | Photo: Jens Henrik Daugaard/ERH

In Scandinavia, where sub-zero rates have been the norm longer than most other places, the finance industry has undergone several drastic adjustments to survive the regime. Banks have relied more on asset management and other services that generate fees, and less on the traditional business of lending and holding deposits.

But with no end to negative rates in sight, those changes may not be enough.

Read the whole article

Get 14 days free access.
No credit card required.

An error has occured. Please try again later.

Get full access for you and your coworkers.

Start a free company trial today

More from AMWatch

Why do Nordic funds have so few female portfolio managers?

Only 16 percent of fund managers in Sweden are women. The figure is 11 percent in Finland, while just 6 percent of fund managers in Denmark and Norway are female. AMWatch has talked to four Nordic women in finance in search of answers regarding this imbalance and hear about their career experiences. 

Fidelity plans to halve CO2 in investment portfolios by 2030

Fidelity International's target will initially be limited to portfolio companies' direct emissions and those that stem from energy the company buys, so-called Scope 1 and Scope 2 emissions. The manager intends to add Scope 3 emissions once it has access to better data.

Further reading

Trial banner

Latest news

Jobs

Latest news from FinansWatch (dk)

Latest news from EnergyWatch

Latest news from ShippingWatch